To Float or not to Float: collection management

float To Float or Not To Float | Collection Management
By Noel Rutherford

Most libraries that adopt floating collections expect circulation to rise because collections will be better distributed to meet patron demand. Yet how many have analyzed whether collections perform better after implementing floating than they did before materials were relocated?
The Nashville Public Library (NPL) undertook an experiment in floating with optimism. Did the results pay off? Here is how it all began.
FLOATING THE IDEA
After attending an American Library Association (ALA) Floating Collections workshop in 2009, I and many other librarians came away fired up about floating and its potential benefits for both our staff and customers. Many libraries had begun floating their collections as a way to decrease transit time and refresh collections without the need to purchase additional material. The intent behind floating—that local interests should drive what’s in the particular library’s collection—was appealing, and anything that made us more efficient had to be worth trying.Full article here

Spread of internet has not conquered ‘digital divide’ between rich and poor – report

Via The Guardian:

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Study by World Bank praises potential of technology to transform lives, but warns of risk of creating a ‘new underclass’ of the disconnected

The rapid spread of the internet and mobile phones around the globe has failed to deliver the expected boost to jobs and growth, the World Bank has revealed in a report that highlights a growing digital divide between rich and poor.

The Bank said no other technology has reached more people in so short a time as the internet, but warned that the development potential of technological change had yet to be reaped.

According to the Bank’s new “World Development Report 2016: Digital Dividends”, the number of people connected to the internet has more than tripled in the past decade, from 1 billion to an estimated 3.5 billion. In many developing countries, more families own a mobile phone than have access to electricity or clean water.

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Share of the Work Force in a Union Falls to a 97-Year Low, 11.3%

Firefighters protested a law curbing collective bargaining rights in Wisconsin in 2011. Union membership fell by 13 percent in the state last year.

By 
Published in the New York Times  January 23, 2013

 

The long decline in the number of American workers belonging to labor unions accelerated sharply last year, according to data reported on Wednesday, sending the unionization rate to its lowest level in close to a century.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said the total number of union members fell by 400,000 last year, to 14.3 million, even though the nation’s overall employment rose by 2.4 million. The percentage of workers in unions fell to 11.3 percent, down from 11.8 percent in 2011, the bureau found in its annual report on union membership. That brought unionization to its lowest level since 1916, when it was 11.2 percent, according to a study by two Rutgers economists, Leo Troy and Neil Sheflin.

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